Black Bristol women who’ve made a difference

Posted on by Fay Curtis.

Finn White, Engagement Officer – Communities

Which Black Bristolian women do we need to shout louder about? You told us that you wanted more stories of inspiring Black Bristolians, so we’re putting together a new story celebrating women who’ve really made a difference.

The top names coming out of our own Black History Steering Group so far are below (in no particular order). There are thousands more but who do you think we should include? Who have we missed? Comment below.

  • Hyacinth Hall – Bristol’s first Black headteacher
  • Cleo Lake – Lord Mayor
  • Fahma Mohamed – Anti-FGM campaigner
  • Barbara Dettering – Teacher and Carnival co-founder
  • Olive Osbourne – Educator and community worker
  • Cathy Waithe – Educator and co-founder of Hummingbird books in St Pauls
  • Carmen Beckford – Carnival co-founder, race relations worker
  • Peaches Golding – Lord Lieutenant of Bristol, High Sheriff of Bristol
  • Marti Burgess – Clubs and restaurant owner, current chair of Carnival
  • Princess Campbell – Pioneering ward sister, community worker, campaigner
  • Valda Jackson – Artist
  • Revd Dawnecia Palmer – Reverend, community worker, peacekeeper
  • Helen Wilson Roe – Artist
  • Hibaq Jama – Bristol’s first Somali Councillor
  • Asher Craig – Deputy Mayor

Find out more about our Black History project.

Image: Photo of Princess Campbell in her nurse uniform in the 1960s.

8 comments on “Black Bristol women who’ve made a difference

  1. Rosie

    Be good to hear more stories even if they weren’t winners

    Reply

  2. Sarah Palmer

    Sherrie Eugene-Hart always seems to be forgotten. Her wiki page barely begins to explain the impact she’s had on our city. She was the first black face i saw regularly on our tv screens in a positive light and she attended so many events in our area making sure we were always inspired. She helped my son when he was failing at school and he is now a successful teacher in the US.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherrie_Eugene-Hart

    Reply

  3. Judy Mead

    Anndeloris Chacon of Bristol Black Carers

    Reply

  4. Judy Mead

    Sandra Meadows CEO of VOSCUR

    Reply

  5. Judy Mead

    Anndeloris Chacon – Bristol Black Carers

    Reply

  6. lynn mareno

    i would agree. Sherrie inspired many women today.

    Sherrie Eugene-Hart always seems to be forgotten. Her wiki page barely begins to explain the impact she’s had on our city. She was the first black face i saw regularly on our tv screens in a positive light and she attended so many events in our area making sure we were always inspired. She helped my son when he was failing at school and he is now a successful teacher in the US.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherrie_Eugene-Hart

    Reply

  7. Owina

    Empress Imani co-founder if Ekome Pan African Dance Company with Paul Anderson 1983-2003.

    Naomi O’Connor (www.LOVEACTIVISTDANCE.com) first black Bristolian Circus Producer.

    Reply

  8. Trish Mensah

    Sherrie Eugene is a must…..not only as one of the first Black faces on local tv but as a signer for Deaf people and showing the need to include Deaf people, so often forgotten

    May Tanner, a ward sister at the BRI on Ward 12 should not be forgotten

    Reply

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